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Factors that influence Critical Chain Project Management (CCPM) Implementation Success by Lisa Repp

by Dr Lisa on August 12, 2012

Lisa Repp wrote her thesis on “Factors that influence critical chain project management implementation success”. A summary of her findings are below as is a link to read the full thesis on Theory of Contraints Critical Chain Project Management (CCPM).

Read all results from Lisa’s thesis pdf at: http://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/61815

Summary of Results (extracted from thesis abstract) by Lisa Repp

The number of completed survey responses (eighty-six from the targeted group) was sufficient to use statistical analysis techniques to draw some preliminary conclusions. However, the quantity of low-success implementations (twenty), when compared to high-success implementations (sixty-six), is significantly lower. Therefore, survey findings are representative of participants completing the survey only and not necessarily of the entire population of CCPM implementations. Further research needs to be conducted to validate results from this study.

Survey findings indicate that the presence of factors is differentiated between high-success and low-success experiences for multi-project and single-project CCPM implementations. For multi-project CCPM implementations, thirteen factors were identified as having differences in median values between high-success and low-success implementations that were statistically significant with the largest number of significant factors residing in the CCPM features factor group. For single-project CCPM implementations, forty-one factors were identified as having differences in median values between high-success and low-success implementations that were statistically significant with the largest concentration of significant factors residing in the change management factor group. Where possible, multi-project and single-project implementations were combined to determine that eighteen factors had differences in median values between high-success and low-success implementations that were statistically significant; the largest number of significant factors resides in the goals established for CCPM factor group and CCPM features factor group.

The low-success multi-project implementations were similar to high-success implementations in many aspects such that many features were highly implemented and attention was given to using good change management practices. Therefore, the slight differences between high-success and low-success multi-project implementations reveal factors that can be detrimental to success even when there is a concerted effort to do everything right. One such detrimental factor was the presence of resistance to the implementation. Low-success single-project implementations, conversely, were characterized as having low levels of CCPM implemented features, low usage of change management techniques, and a belief that the CCPM method was “too complex.” The comparisons between high-success and low-success single-project implementations, therefore, revealed numerous factors such as goals, CCPM features, and change management techniques that are most essential to achieving success.

Ten interviews were conducted as part of the study. The interviews revealed fourteen new potentially significant factors, twelve of which were common amongst two or more interviewees. The emergence of these new factors suggests that there are other potentially significant CCPM factors that may not be represented in the survey and interview combined. Further research may be able to identify other factors that can contribute to CCPM implementation success.

The survey (via comment boxes) and interview process combined identified new factors to be included in future research into CCPM implementations. The interviews also identified the need for researching sustainment of CCPM in an organization, instead of focusing solely on the implementation. One key factor in such research would be the impact of organizational structure on the sustainment of CCPM in an organization.

Read all results from Lisa’s thesis pdf at: http://digital.library.wisc.edu/1793/61815

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